The Adventures of Django and Arya

Iceland

Cats and dogs can be imported to Iceland under strict conditions designed​ to manage biosecurity risks. The pet import regulations set by the Iceland Food and Veterinary Authority (MAST) only allow for animals to arrive from approved exporting countries. Requirements on entry to Iceland with cats and dogs therefore depend on your country of origin. An Pet Import Permit is needed to enter Iceland rather than the Pet Passport Scheme used in the EU. You may already be aware that quarantine is mandatory for all cats and dogs entering Iceland from most countries. However, in 2020, the mandatory quarantine period for pets arriving in Iceland reduced by 50%, from 4 weeks to 2 weeks. Travellers with licensed and registered Assistance or Service Dogs can apply for their dog to carry out the mandatory quarantine at home, rather than in one of Iceland’s 2 pet quarantine facilities. Emotional Support Animals (ESAs) can’t be considered for home quarantine in Iceland, but Psychiatric Service Dogs will be considered. In all cases, pets can only enter Iceland on specific dates between 0600hrs-1700hrs. There isn’t a minimum age set for cats and dogs being imported to Iceland, as by the time all requirements are met, they will be at least 4.5 months for Category 1 countries, and at least 7 months old for Category 2 countries. Animals can only enter Iceland via Keflavik international Airport, there are no authorised ferry ports for pet arrivals.

Iceland pet rules pet travel cats dogs pet import certificate Iceland

Estimated reading time: 9 minutes

Iceland Import Permit for Cats & Dogs

Before you travel to Iceland with your cat or dog, you must apply for an Import Permit:

The completed and signed document should be scanned and emailed to petimport@mast.is.

Within 5-10 days of your pet’s arrival in Iceland, they must have a Health Examination performed by a licensed veterinarian. All information must be recorded on the appropriate Certificate of Health & Origin (D1/D2/C1/C2) form. Be aware that the form is different for dogs and cats, and the correct form should be used for your Category 1 or Category 2 country of origin.

Cost of Importing a Pet to Iceland

A flat rate pet import fee is charged for all cats and dogs arriving in Iceland of 37,400 ISK, which is approximately €250. Furthermore, a charge is also payable to the quarantine facility.

Pet Quarantine Facilities in Iceland

Due to the strict Pet Import Scheme in Iceland, all cats and dogs must stay at one of 2 pet quarantine facilities for 2 weeks. The 2 pet quarantine stations are:

However, their stay will be extended if there are issues that increase the biosecurity risk. For example, if a tick is found on your dog, they’ll have to remain in quarantine until blood testing is repeated. In this case, the pet owner is responsible for any additional costs.

Pets must arrive in Iceland between 0600hrs-1700hrs, but you can apply to MAST if you have to enter Iceland outside these hours. Their email address is petimport@mast.is. Out of hours fees will apply if your pet is approved to arrive outside the set hours.

Each Icelandic Pet Quarantine Facility periodically releases dates that they will accept arriving cats and dogs. The admission dates for pets arriving in Iceland is always a 3 day period every 3 weeks. You can find the latest pet import calendar on the facility’s website by clicking the above links.

Home Quarantine for Assistance & Service Dogs in Iceland

If you’re travelling to Iceland with a trained and certified Assistance or Service Dog, you can apply for your dog to undergo the 14 day quarantine at home. This includes Psychiatric Service Dogs, but not Emotional Support Animals (ESAs), which aren’t recognised as Assistance Dogs. Assistance & Service Dogs are trained to perform a specific task for their owner, and you must have documentary evidence of this to take your pet to Iceland.

Rabies Vaccination for Cats & Dogs

Every dog or cat entering Iceland must have a Rabies Vaccination. In addition, a rabies antibody serology titer test must be done during the specified time period:

  • Category 1 Countries
    The rabies antibody test must be carried out by an EU approved laboratory at least 30 days after the vaccination. If the result is clear, your cat or dog can travel to Iceland immediately.
  • Category 2 Countries
    The rabies antibody test must be carried out by an EU approved laboratory at least 30 days after the vaccination. If the result is clear, you must wait 90 days from the date the sample was collected before travelling to Iceland with your pet. This is due to the fact that It can take 90 days for an animal infected with rabies to show symptoms of the disease. During this period, it isn’t possible to tell if an animal has been infected.

Additional Vaccinations and Blood Tests for Dogs

All dogs must also receive the following vaccinations, at least 14 days before travelling to Iceland:

  • Leptospirosis
  • Canine distemper
  • Infectious canine hepatitis
  • Canine parvovirus
  • Canine parainfluenza

You must have a vaccination certificate to prove that your dog has been vaccinated against these diseases.

Brucella canis – blood test. Within the last 30 days prior to importation, a blood sample shall be drawn
from the dog for testing for brucellosis (Brucella canis). Approved laboratory tests for B. canis: IFAT,
RSAT, TAT. The test result must be negative and recorded in the Certificate of Health and Origin (D1).
The laboratory report in English containing the laboratory name, microchip number, blood sample
date and test result must accompany the certificate.

Leishmaniasis Test

In addition, at least 30 days before you dog is imported to Iceland, they must receive a blood test to check for Leishmaniasis. Approved laboratory tests for this are the PCR and ELISA. The test result must be negative and be recorded on the Certificate of Health in English. Proof of results must contain the laboratory name, microchip number, blood sample date and test result.

Angiostrongylus Vasorum

The requirement for Angiostrongylus Vasorum (AV) is that your dog must either be tested for infection or treated preventively. It’s your choice to decide with the veterinarian which option is best:

Test for AV

A blood test or fecal sample must be carried out within 30 days prior to importation. The test result must be negative and be recorded on the Certificate of Health in English. Proof of results must contain the laboratory name, microchip number, blood sample date and test result.

Preventive treatment for AV

If you opt for preventative treatments instead of the blood test, 5-10 days prior to importation your dog must be treated preventively for AV with an approved antiparasitic medicinal product (spot-on) containing imidacloprid and moxidectin eg: Advocate® or Advantage Multi® treatments.

Parasite Treatment for Dogs

Within 21-28 days prior to importation, your dog must be treated for internal and external parasites. The veterinary medicinal product(s) used for external parasites must be registered for lice, fleas and ticks. The veterinary medicinal product(s) used for internal parasites must be registered for roundworm and tapeworm.

A second treatment for internal and external parasites must be carried out 5-10 days prior to importation.

Pets arriving in Iceland by plane

Flying to Iceland with your cat or dog is the only way, as Keflavik international Airport is the sole authorised pet entry point. Your cat or dog can fly with you to Iceland in the cabin of a plane, provided that the airline provides this service. Airlines have individual pet travel policies, that comply with International Air Transport Association (IATA) requirements, as well as local laws for exporting and importing pets.

If you do opt to fly your pet to Iceland in the cabin, you must notify MAST beforehand at petimport@mast.is.

Pets too large to fly in the cabin will travel in the ventilated and temperature cargo hold of the aircraft.

Category 1: Taking a Pet to Iceland from a Rabies Free Country

Dogs and cats can be imported from a Category 1 country, provided that they have lived in a Category 1 country for at least 6 months, or since birth, before entering Iceland. Your pet still has to spend 14 days in quarantine upon arrival in Iceland from a Category 1 country.

The following countries/territories fall under this category, as they are deemed rabies free:

Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Faroe Islands, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway (excl. Svalbard), Portugal, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom (Scotland, England, Wales & Northern Ireland)

Rabies Vaccination
Rabies Serology Titer Test
Additional Required Vaccinations & Blood Tests
D1 or C1 Certificate of Health & Origin
Pet Import Permit
Inspection on Arrival
Mandatory 2 Week Pet Quarantine
Iceland Pet Import Rules Category 1

Category 2: Taking your cat or dog to Iceland from a Low Risk Rabies Country

Approved pet exporting countries in Category 2 are:

Rabies Vaccination
Rabies Serology Titer Test
Additional Required Vaccinations & Blood Tests
D2 or C2 Certificate of Health & Origin
Pet Import Permit
Inspection on Arrival
Mandatory 2 Week Pet Quarantine
Iceland Pet Import Rules Category 2

Taking Pets to Iceland from Non-Listed Countries

If a country from which an importer intends to import a dog or a cat is not on the list, the importer can apply for the country to be assessed by MAST as to whether that country can be considered an approved exporting country. The approved country list is revised twice a year by MAST.

However MAST may authorize the import of a dog or a cat from a non-approved country of export, when the following conditions are met:

  • The pet has been owned and cared for by the importer in the country of export for at least six months prior to importation
  • The owner/importer is a resident in the country of export and is moving to Iceland and bringing the pet with him/her
  • The ownership of the pet and the residency in the country of export must be confirmed with valid documents submitted to MAST along with this application form
  • A dog/cat that is imported to Iceland on these grounds must meet the health conditions according to country Category 2

You can send your request to MAST online if you wish them to consider adding your country to Iceland’s approved pet export list.

Remember to always protect your pet against biting insects when in a foreign country, in addition to the pet travel rules for your destination.

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